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Welcome to the memorial page for

Kenneth Keith Gray

June 24, 1952 ~ March 9, 2013 (age 60)
Kenneth (Keith) Gray passed away from a heart attack on Saturday March 9, 2013 at Ski Santa Fe after spending a great morning skiing powder with Chris Collier. Keith was proud of his New Mexico heritage. His grandparents on his father's side came in a covered wagon to Deming from Mississippi. And his mother's parents arrived in New Mexico just one step ahead of the law to the area near the Gila River. Keith was born in space in Santa Rita, New Mexico, raised outside Silver City and in Cliff, New Mexico until he was twelve when he moved with his family to Alamogordo. Keith loved reliving the old west through Encore Westerns. He graduated from Alamogordo High School and the College of Santa Fe. He was predeceased by his father, Charles Golden Gray, his mother Lorine (Shorty) Patterson Gray, his brother who died as a toddler, Roy Kenneth Gray and his older brother Ray Charles Gray who died in 2005. Keith leaves his mate for life, Dia Winograd, his daughters, Melissa Gray of Albuquerque and Amy Gray of Seattle and their mother Susan Sylvester, his stepdaughters Facile Cherkes of San Francisco and Margie Levy and family of Los Angeles, California along with life long friends (we wish we could mention every one of you) who loved him for his upbeat attitude, wise counsel, warmth and vitality. Keith was a partner retired from Gordon and Hale, PC, CPAs where he worked for many years. Keith will be sorely missed especially when the music starts on the Santa Fe Plaza. Who will be the first one out on the dance floor now? Keith's Party for Peace will be held at Tiny's Restaurant and Lounge Wednesday March 13, 2013 starting at 1:00 PM. Bring photos and stories. In lieu of flowers please feel free to contribute to a cause in which you and Keith shared a common interest.


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